A New Day, a New Mars

First there was evidence of fossil bacteria in a Martian rock found in Antarctica. Next came confirmation of liquid water on the surface of Mars in the distant past. Now three separate scientific teams have discovered methane in the Martian atmosphere. On Earth, two primary sources produce methane: volcanoes and life.

So, what is the source of that methane on Mars? First, scientists needs to confirm that the methane actually exists there and is not an error in their research. Next, differences in methane concentration need to be mapped and correlated with possible Martian sources. Finally, robots and/or humans need to explore the potential sources up close. I volunteer.

Published by

Richard Leis

Richard Leis is a fiction writer and poet, with his first published poem forthcoming later in 2017 from Impossible Archetype. His essays about fairy tales and technology have been published on Tiny Donkey. Richard is also the Downlink Lead for the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) team at the University of Arizona. He monitors images of the Martian surface taken by the HiRISE camera located on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in orbit around Mars and helps ensure they process successfully and are validated for quick release to the science community and public. Once upon a time, Richard wrote and edited the science and technology news and commentary website Frontier Channel, hosted the RADIO Frontier Channel podcast, and organized transhumanist clubs. Follow Richard on his website (richardleis.com), on Goodreads (richardleis), his Micro.blog (@richardleis), Twitter (@richardleisjr), and Facebook (richardleisjr).