A Grid for the Brain

Brain-machine interface technology seems to be advancing more quickly than predicted. Scientists at Washington University have successfully implanted a brain grid into patients that reads their electrocorticographic (ECoG) brain activity and allows them to move a cursor on a computer screen with a thought. This breakthrough supersedes previous technology that read and translated electroencephalographic (EEG) brain activity. Patients using the new technology were able to learn their cursor mind control task in an hour, far less than the several months older technology required.

Many people will likely be squeamish at the idea, especially when they hear that the brain grid requires direct implantation into the brain so that it can read the ECoG data directly. However, past squeamishness has often become indifferent acceptance, a signature trend of all successful technologies.

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Richard Leis

Richard Leis is a fiction writer and poet, with his first published poem forthcoming later in 2017 from Impossible Archetype. His essays about fairy tales and technology have been published on Tiny Donkey. Richard is also the Downlink Lead for the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) team at the University of Arizona. He monitors images of the Martian surface taken by the HiRISE camera located on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in orbit around Mars and helps ensure they process successfully and are validated for quick release to the science community and public. Once upon a time, Richard wrote and edited the science and technology news and commentary website Frontier Channel, hosted the RADIO Frontier Channel podcast, and organized transhumanist clubs. Follow Richard on his website (richardleis.com), on Goodreads (richardleis), his Micro.blog (@richardleis), Twitter (@richardleisjr), and Facebook (richardleisjr).