The Rise of the Brains

In the mid-1990s, scientists succeeded in merging brain neurons with a microchip to allow communication between the two. Since then, scientists have improved the technology. Early in 2004 they succeeded in cultivating snail neurons on a microchip.

At the University of Florida, scientists have grown a brain from rat neurons that is learning to operate a flight simulator program on a computer. Insight into the way neurons network and learn could help improve computer and networking technologies.

Meanwhile, students at the University of Arizona are using modern AI technology to create small surveillance planes that think for themselves. Unmanned surveillance drones are increasingly being used by the military, but they are big. Smaller versions are harder to detect.

Biology and computer technology are beginning to merge in interesting ways, heralding an age of integration that may find us humans as just one component in a much more complex entity.

Published by

Richard Leis

Richard Leis is a writer and poet. His first published poem, "Roadside Freak Show," arrives on August 21, 2017 in Impossible Archetype.  His essays about fairy tales and technology have been published on Tiny Donkey. Richard is also the Downlink Lead for the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) team at the University of Arizona. He monitors images of the Martian surface taken by the HiRISE camera located on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in orbit around Mars and helps ensure they process successfully and are validated for quick release to the science community and public. Once upon a time, Richard wrote and edited the science and technology news and commentary website Frontier Channel, hosted the RADIO Frontier Channel podcast, and organized transhumanist clubs. Follow Richard on his website (richardleis.com), on Goodreads (richardleis), Twitter (@richardleisjr), and Facebook (richardleisjr).