Huygens Heads to Titan

On December 24, 2004 the Huygens probe separated from the Cassini spacecraft and began a three week journey to Titan, when it will parachute through the moon’s thick atmosphere and snap images on its way to the surface. Cassini recently imaged the probe as a bright spot of light against a background of stars.

Scientists hope Huygens can shed some light on the alien landscape of Titan, perhaps revealing whether or not the surface is solid, liquid, or slushy. Images of the surface returned over the past few months by Cassini have only added to the mystery. The surface appears to be relatively flat and young, suggesting current tectonic activity.

On January 14, 2005 and the days following, Frontier Channel will provide coverage of Huygens landing on Titan with the latest images and information from NASA and ESA

Richard Leis

Richard Leis

Richard Leis (he/him/his) lives in Tucson, Arizona where he writes poetry and fiction, attends and teaches writing workshops at the Writers Studio Tucson, and works for HiRISE, a team in the Lunar & Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona with a camera in orbit around Mars onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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