Human Trials for Artificial Retinas Successful

One of the top news stories about the future of medical technology making the rounds last week was based on a journal article now almost a year old. In the April 2004 issue of the Archives of Ophthalmology doctors reported on “The Artificial Silicon Retina Microchip for the Treatment of Vision Loss From Retinitis Pigmentosa.” These tiny chips contain about “5000 microelectrode-tipped microphotodiodes”, or solar collectors which send their signal to still-functioning retinal neurons. The six patients in the study, all suffering from retinitis pigmentosa, reported improved vision and no side effects, such as infection.

The prospect of silicon computer technology and human biological cells working together to correct and cure medical conditions was once dismissed as fantasy. This work, along with the many other threads of technology being tested successfully elsewhere, is proving just how adaptive biology can be.

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Richard Leis

Richard Leis is a writer and poet. His first published poem, "Roadside Freak Show," arrives on August 21, 2017 in Impossible Archetype.  His essays about fairy tales and technology have been published on Tiny Donkey. Richard is also the Downlink Lead for the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) team at the University of Arizona. He monitors images of the Martian surface taken by the HiRISE camera located on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in orbit around Mars and helps ensure they process successfully and are validated for quick release to the science community and public. Once upon a time, Richard wrote and edited the science and technology news and commentary website Frontier Channel, hosted the RADIO Frontier Channel podcast, and organized transhumanist clubs. Follow Richard on his website (richardleis.com), on Goodreads (richardleis), Twitter (@richardleisjr), and Facebook (richardleisjr).