Welcome to the New Frontier Channel

Frontier Channel has been through a lot of changes over the years, but the changes going into effect over the next month are the biggest yet. The news site has been moved to frontierchannel.com from frontierchannel.tv, which will become “VIDEO Frontier Channel” and home to our first video content (coming soon.) The podcast “RADIO Frontier Channel” remains at radio.frontierchannel.tv, but will soon undergo its own face lift.

One major task remains: converting previous articles to the new layout and moving them from frontierchannel.tv to frontierchannel.com. So far the few articles from 2000 and 2002 have been successfully moved and the short format articles prior to December 2004 are in progress. The December 2004 and a majority of the 2005 articles are next but will take the longest to complete.

As a result of this move, links from search engines and other sites will be broken. The previous RSS news feed has been replaced with http://feeds.feedburner.com/frontierchannel. I apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate your patience. This will likely be the last major hierarchical change made to Frontier Channel.

Along with the move comes a new look for Frontier Channel. Gone is the magazine format and here to stay is the news portal format. More color and variety has been added, the layout is cleaner, and soon there will be new pages to better explain Frontier Channel and its features.

Some things remain the same. For one, images continue to be large format. The overall emphasis of Frontier Channel has always been on images, because rapidly accelerating progress in science and technology is best presented and appreciated visually. A textual description cannot do justice to the recently discovered water ice plumes on Saturn’s moon Enceladus, for example. With this in mind, VIDEO Frontier Channel and an enhanced RADIO Frontier Channel will soon join Frontier Channel to bring you the wonders of the Great Frontiers in all their audiovisual splendor.

Published by

Richard Leis

Richard Leis is a fiction writer and poet, with his first published poem forthcoming later in 2017 from Impossible Archetype. His essays about fairy tales and technology have been published on Tiny Donkey. Richard is also the Downlink Lead for the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) team at the University of Arizona. He monitors images of the Martian surface taken by the HiRISE camera located on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter in orbit around Mars and helps ensure they process successfully and are validated for quick release to the science community and public. Once upon a time, Richard wrote and edited the science and technology news and commentary website Frontier Channel, hosted the RADIO Frontier Channel podcast, and organized transhumanist clubs. Follow Richard on his website (richardleis.com), on Goodreads (richardleis), his Micro.blog (@richardleis), Twitter (@richardleisjr), and Facebook (richardleisjr).