Tag: book review

  • Review: Cradleland of Parasites by Sara Tantlinger

    Review: Cradleland of Parasites by Sara Tantlinger

    Cradleland of Parasites might be Sara Tantlinger’s best collection yet, a sequence of frightening, gruesome, breathtakingly beautiful poems about the Black Plague and other very real pestilence horrors up through modern times.

  • Review: House of Zolo’s Journal of Speculative Literature, Volume 3

    Review: House of Zolo’s Journal of Speculative Literature, Volume 3

    The future is frightening, often radically different, sometimes bleak, sometimes hopeful, sometimes both in the beautiful poems and short fiction included in the latest volume of House of Zolo’s Journal of Speculative Literature.

  • Review: Nightmare, Issue 93 (June 2020)

    Review: Nightmare, Issue 93 (June 2020)

    I really love every story in this issue. Everything had the right amount of tension, chills, and ambiguity. There’s an image of attendees at a party after the party is over in “Girls Without Their Faces On” by Laird Barron that will haunt me forever. As will the Dorset Ooser from “We, the Folk” by G.V. Anderson, which can you can find on Wikipedia and elsewhere. It’s real. AHHH!

  • Review: Fantasy, Issue 61 (November 2020)

    Review: Fantasy, Issue 61 (November 2020)

    Fantasy Magazine has been on hiatus for several years, but new editors Arley Sorg and Christie Yant have relaunched the magazine starting with Issue 61 and four short or flash prose pieces and two poems, along with interviews. In their opening editorial, Sorg and Yant discuss why they’re bringing the magazine back now; it’s a timely relaunch, to be sure.

  • Review: Lightspeed, Issue 126 (November 2020)

    Review: Lightspeed, Issue 126 (November 2020)

    There’s a humorous tone to some of the stories in the latest issue of Lightspeed Magazine I don’t think I’m really in the right place emotionally right now to completely appreciate, which might explain why my favorite story in this issue is probably “Burn the Ships” by Alberto Yáñez. It’s dark, but also deeply satisfying by the end.

  • Review: True Crime by Samantha Kolesnik

    Review: True Crime by Samantha Kolesnik

    True Crime by Samantha Kolesnik is a difficult book to read, for sure, but what’s so remarkable about it and why I continued reading is how the author navigates this brutal material.

  • Review: Lightspeed Issue 120 (May 2020)

    Review: Lightspeed Issue 120 (May 2020)

    Cover of Lightspeed Magazine issue 120 May 2020 with painting of town in valley surrounded by mountains with two people in the sky and circle portals showing different futuristic times arranged in a spiral Lightspeed’s May 2020 issue includes stories by some of my favorite authors, and some new favorites.

  • Review: In the Scrape by James Newman and Mark Steensland

    At 94 pages, In the Scrape by James Newman and Mark Steensland is a quick read, but be warned that the mounting tension might require an occasional break to catch your breath. You’re going to need the oxygen: the final third of the book, when the breathless pace escalates and characters become even more desperate, becomes unputdownable.

  • Review: Cricket Hunters by Jeremy Hepler

    Cricket Hunters subverts the usual tropes and nostalgia of coming-of-age horror by reaching for something even darker in this tale of friendship and rivalry

  • Review: Midnight in the Graveyard Edited by Kenneth W. Cain

    I have definitely been in the mood for ghost stories, and Midnight in the Graveyard, the first anthology from Silver Shamrock Publishing, delivers the ghostly goods!

  • Review: Phreak by JE Solo

    Review: Phreak by JE Solo

    Book cover of Phreak by JE Solo with shadow of a person in hoodie against a chainlink fence Phreak often worked against my narrative expectations with its fragmented, time-jumping, and vignette-style approach, and in the process delivered a singular character whose clear and deeply felt recollections warn us how close we are to delivering a similarly bleak future to the next generation. You’ll want to get your hands on this novel as soon as possible.

  • Review: How We Broke by Bracken MacLeod and Paul Michael Anderson

    Review: How We Broke by Bracken MacLeod and Paul Michael Anderson

    Book cover of How We Broke by Bracken MacLeod and Paul Michael Anderson with five Polaroids revealing two fractured people This little novella full of big revelations and emotions really got to me.

  • Review: Snow by Ronald Malfi

    Review: Snow by Ronald Malfi

    Book cover for Snow by Ronald Malfi featuring a tree with a eerie blue figure peering out at the snowy landscape and a gate The rapid pace doesn’t get in the way of good details and atmosphere; I felt the cold, eeriness, and rising tension along the way. What they encounter is creepy as hell and led to heart-pounding horror and heartbreaking deaths.